FJ Photography

Military aviation journalism and photography by Steve Davies
Contact Me

Steve Davies is a military and commercial aviation photojournalist based in Cambridge, England. He began writing in 2001, and has since authored and co-authored 15 books. His freelance writing includes a plethora of articles penned for the world’s leading monthly and quarterly aviation publications, and he has also worked on a range of aviation supplements that have sold millions of copies globally. He has worked as a subject matter expert for a range of military aviation documentaries commissioned by terrestrial television channels in the UK, Europe and North America, and by the History Channel. His photography has been used not only by the aviation press, but also by leading defence contractors and aviation corporations.

  • When two Navy F-14 Tomcats engaged and shot down two Sukhoi Su-22 jet fighters in 1981, they drew on experience and tactics that they had learned from a previous encounter with MiG jet fighters. The difference between the two encounters was that in the first, the enemy fighters were flown by American pilots assigned to a top secret squadron hidden at a remote airfield in the ultra-secret Tonopah Nuclear Test range, Nevada. In the second, the Sukhoi fighters were flown by Libyan pilots attempting to enforce Colonel Qadaffi’s ‘Line of Death’ over the Gulf of Sidra.

    From the mid-1960s until the end of the Cold War, the United States Air Force acquired and flew Russian-made MiG jets, eventually creating a secret squadron dedicated to exposing American fighter pilots to enemy MiGs. Following underperformance in the Vietnam War, the USAF began to study MiGs in order to improve fighter pilot training. This then developed into the “black” Constant Peg program. In this program, MiGs were secretly acquired, and made airworthy, a difficult task without manuals or parts. Finally, a program of exposing American fighter pilots to the MiGs was developed. In all, more than 1,600 American fighter pilots would train against America’s secret MiGs between 1974 and 1989…

    View on Amazon

  • With its twin tail, the F-15 Eagle is probably the most recognizable military jet fighter in the skies today, and is undoubtedly the most successful jet fighter of all time, having never been shot down in combat. Flown not only by the US Air Force but by the air forces of Israel, Saudi Arabia and even Japan, and, with almost 30 years service, the F-15 is the world’s leading operational air superiority and interceptor.

    Steve Davies and Doug Dildy draw on a vast array of sources including combat records, technical documents, and unpublished first-hand accounts from the pilots themselves to tell the story of this amazing plane, detailing such incredible feats as the Israeli F-15 which was successfully landed despite losing a wing. Containing over 100 breathtaking color photographs and comprising detailed technical information, this definitive history and guide to the world’s most successful jet fighter is a “must have” for anyone interested in modern aviation.

    View on Amazon

  • Throughout its 34-year Cold War career with the USAF and CIA, the top secret Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird spy plane was the world’s fastest and highest-flying operational manned aircraft. Dedicated to strategic reconnaissance, the Blackbird was so fast that no other aircraft could catch it. The co-authors are world authorities on the Blackbird and give rare insights into the secret world of the SR-71, its genesis, construction and anatomy (including its use of stealth technology), and its operation and maintenance in peace and war.

    View on Amazon

  • The eight-engine Boeing B-52 Stratofortress jet was the USA’s first long-range, swept-wing heavy bomber. It began life as an intercontinental, high-altitude Cold War nuclear bomber. With each new variant the B-52 increased in range, power and capability, seeing active service in the Vietnam War, both Gulf Wars of 1991 and 2003, and over Afghanistan in 2001. Author Steve Davies recalls its combat history, gets up close to look under the skin of the B-52, and talks to the flight crews and maintainers of this legendary aircraft.

    View on Amazon

  • Officially called the Fighting Falcon by the USAF (a name loathed by pilots and ground crews), the F-16 is popularly referred to as the ‘Viper’. First introduced into service with the USAF in 1978, the F-16 is a successful all-weather multi-role jet fighter of which more than 4,500 have been built and exported to 25 countries worldwide. It remains in service more than 30 years later. The Viper incorporates a number of innovative design features that include a frameless bubble canopy for better visibility, pilot’s side-mounted control stick for ease of control when manoeuvring, a seat reclined 30 degrees to reduce the effect of g-forces on the pilot, and the first use of a relaxed static stability/fly-by-wire flight control system that makes the Viper a highly agile aircraft. At the ‘business end’ the F-16 has an internal M61 Vulcan cannon and eleven weapon-mounting stations.

    View on Amazon

  • Steve Davies, military aviation photographer and critically acclaimed author of Red Eagles, is back with a new photo-essay on American’s cutting-edge fighter fleet. Davies examines the F/A-18C/D/E/F Super Hornet, F-15E Strike Eagle, F-16CG/F-16CJ, F-22A Raptor, and the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, taking readers on a complete behinds-the-scenes tour of these fearsome jets, from the hangers to the skies. In between, Davies explores the cutting edge technology that makes these birds fly and interviews the pilots and ground crews that make them sing. Join Davies for this all-access tour of the mighty jets that help keep America the world’s only air superpower

    View on Amazon

  • The McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle is a twin-engine, highly maneuverable, all-weather tactical jet fighter, designed to gain and maintain air superiority in aerial combat. It is considered among the most successful of modern jet fighters with 104 aerial combat victories to its credit, with no losses (combined figure across all user-air forces). The F-15 Eagle first flew in July 1972 and entered service with the USAF in 1976. It is expected to remain in service with the USAF until 2025.

    View on Amazon

Get in touch